Corrie McKeague | Suffolk Constabulary

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Corrie McKeague

Detectives investigating the disappearance of Corrie McKeague have reached the point where there are no realistic lines of enquiry left to pursue. (26 March 2018)

As the missing airman has not been found the case will remain open and move to the Major investigation cold case team.

Any credible new information will continue to be followed up by officers.

Having been through all realistic possibilities in detail over the past 18 months since Corrie went missing in Bury St Edmunds on September 24, 2016, there is nothing to suggest any foul play or third party involvement.

Since November last year police have been re-examining the evidence relating to all realistic theories to identify whether there is anything else that could be done to establish what could have happened to Corrie. 

However, this ‘mature assessment’ of all the evidence still points to Corrie being transported from the ‘horseshoe’ area in a bin lorry and ultimately taken to the Milton landfill site.

Detective Superintendent Katie Elliott said: "It is extremely disappointing that we have not been able to find Corrie. I can only imagine the strain Corrie’s family have been under over the past 18 months and I thank them for their patience and understanding.

"Whilst the investigation has drawn to a natural conclusion we will continue to work with the family to provide answers to their questions and help them understand what may have happened.

"Since Corrie disappeared, police have been exploring all proportionate and relevant lines of enquiry.

"We have now reached a point where we are unable to make any further progress, and have gone as far as we realistically can with the information we have. If any new, credible and proportionate enquiries relating to Corrie’s disappearance emerge we will pursue them.”

Corrie’s family have been informed of this development.

Assistant Chief Constable Simon Megicks from Suffolk Constabulary said: "Saddened as I am that we have not found Corrie, I have absolute confidence in the way the investigation was conducted.

"The major investigation team inquiry has been reviewed at various points by senior officers within the constabulary and external experts, including the East Midlands Special Operations Unit.

"The unit’s report concludes police have conducted a thorough and detailed investigation, and explored all reasonable lines of enquiry. It also endorses the primary hypothesis that Corrie ended up in the waste disposal process.”


Fact File:

  1. More than 1,500 people have been spoken to during inquiry.
  2. More than 2,000 hours of CCTV have been looked at.
  3. A total of 529 statements have been taken.
  4. The estimated size of the area searched outside of Milton landfill (i.e. open land searched etc.) Total square miles searched 20.4 miles  + road 6.5 miles
  5. Size of Milton landfill site: The entire landfill site is set in 71.2 hectares. The area that was being used to take waste during September 2016 was an area known as Cell 22. Cell 22 is approximately 14 hectares in size.
  6. Size of first area searched in Cell 22: Phase 1 06/03/17 - 21/07/17  20 weeks total 6,604 tonnes
  7. Size of second area searched in Cell 22: Phase 2 23/10/17 - 11/12/17   7 weeks 1 day 2,867.5 tonnes
  8. The search team on the landfill site consisted of a Police Search Adviser lead, Police Search Adviser team leader and eight Licensed Search Officers at any time per week.

Please click here for Frequently Asked Questions

Previous release | 11 November 2016

Work is continuing to trace missing 23-year-old Corrie McKeague as police continue to ask anyone with information about his disappearance to come forward.

Extensive enquiries are ongoing to try to find Corrie, who was last seen in Bury St Edmunds in the early hours of Saturday 24 September.

Police have seized 1,100 hours of CCTV footage from both local authority, business and private individual sources. Over the past weeks this has been systematically viewed to see if there any further sightings of Corrie. Starting from the last confirmed sighting at 3.25am in Brentgovel Street the hours of footage have been gone through in time and location order – gradually expanding outwards to 8am and further away from the point of the last confirmed images of him.

There remain no positive sightings of Corrie, however this work continues and all footage has been sent for further detailed analysis to ensure nothing has been missed.

Searches have been carried out in a wide area between Bury St Edmunds, Honington and Barton Mills. This search strategy was put in place by specialist police officers and carried out by police, RAF personnel and volunteers from Suffolk Lowland Search and Rescue (SULSAR) and NSARDA (National Search And Rescue Dogs Association). 

In the early stages roadsides between Bury St Edmunds and Honington were searched with this being expanded from the roads to surrounding farmland and woodland and to the Barton Mills area. To date searches have been carried out along possible routes between Bury and the base, on a route parallel to the A134 between Honington and Fornham St Martin, on the A1101 between the Fiveways roundabout at Barton Mills and Icklingham, around the Great Livermere area, between the A134 and A143 and in waterways.  SULSAR and the RAF have assisted with water searches in the River Lark and in bodies of water and ditches between the town and the base.

British Transport Police assisted with searches along the railway line from Bury St Edmunds, while the National Police Air Service helicopter has been carrying out searches throughout the investigation.

Specialist RAF search teams have joined Suffolk police officers and Suffolk Lowland Search and Rescue volunteers to carry out line searching of wooded areas too. New searches are being considered as the enquiry continues.

As well as a team of police search officers, CCTV viewers and detectives carrying out enquiries, a number of other police staff have been supporting the investigation in various areas including to help identify and trace those seen on CCTV and, since the start of the enquiry, uniformed Suffolk officers have carried out visits and checks.  

In addition to RAF military police investigators, RAF search personnel and intelligence staff, Suffolk Constabulary are also receiving assistance from other specialist teams from other forces including CCTV viewers from Metropolitan Police.

All of Suffolk Police’s work has been reviewed by other forces since the beginning of the investigation to ensure everything possible is being done.

Detective Superintendent Katie Elliott said; “We have to keep an open mind as there is no key line of enquiry to take us in any one direction. We can’t rule anything out and therefore we have to continue to investigate all possibilities.  Despite extensive searches, CCTV viewing, media appeals and many behind the scenes enquiries we still do not have a lead which takes us forward.  Many theories are being explored and work is ongoing to trace everyone who was in the area around the key time as they may have information that may help.

“Officers have been working to locate all individuals and vehicles seen in the area in the early hours and have spoken to dozens of people, however we know there are still some who haven’t come forward or been traced and we would continue to ask anyone in the vicinity that morning to come forward.

“We have received support from many people in this work and we are grateful to all those who are assisting. It is important that we systematically work through all the information that has come into the enquiry and this work is continuing.”

Anyone who may have been out in the Bury St Edmunds, Honington or Barton Mills area in the early hours of Saturday 24 September or anyone with information that may help should call the incident room on 01473 782019.

Previous release | 15 November 2016

Suffolk Police will be closing one lane of the A14 at 10am tomorrow morning (Tuesday 15 November) east of Bury St Edmunds, as the search for missing RAF serviceman Corrie McKeague continues.

After rush hour, one lane of the eastbound carriageway will be closed between the Moreton Hall and Rougham junctions, in order for police search teams to conduct searches at the roadside.

The search will cover a mile and a half stretch of road and will continue into the afternoon, when the road is expected to fully reopen.

Previous release | 25 November 2016

Following the pod being in place in Bury over the past two days, police are thanking all those who have attended.

Detective Superintendent Katie Elliott said; “We’re grateful to members of the public in Bury for coming along to view the images, and have had queues at the pod at some points during the day yesterday, due to the amount of people who want to assist. Because of this we’re looking to extend the opening hours of the pod into this evening to give more people the chance to engage and pass on information.”

Previous release - 23 November 2016

A police pod will be in place in the centre of Bury St Edmunds tomorrow and Friday, 24 and 25 November, as officers continue to investigate the disappearance of Corrie McKeague.

The pod will be open between 9am and 5pm on both days as officers work to identify individuals seen on CCTV in the Brentgovel Street and Short Brackland area of the town between 3am and 8am on Saturday 24 September, around the time of the last confirmed sighting of Corrie at 3.25am.

In the early stages of the enquiry officers worked overnight Friday nights into Saturday morning from a pod in Bury to show pub and club goers, and early morning workers, the images to see if they could help with identification. Other work has since been carried out to identify them, with continual appeals made for anyone there to come forward.

There remain a number of people who have not been identified, however in many cases there are few distinguishing characteristics to help with this process, so officers will again go out in the town, this time during the day, to see if anyone can assist.

Behind the scenes, police are continuing to work with partners to analyse CCTV footage in more detail.  Further work is also currently being done around the footage to ensure nothing has been missed.

A lot of work continues on the enquiry and police continue to ask anyone with information that may help find Corrie to call the incident room on 01473 782019.

Previous release | 8 December 2016

Police are releasing CCTV images of potential witnesses as work continues to trace missing Corrie McKeague.

All of the images show individuals in Bury St Edmunds town centre between 3.15am and 5.20am who have not yet been traced. Police are releasing the images after carrying out work to try and identify all of those who were in the area around the crucial time that Corrie went missing, as part of ongoing enquiries to find out what happened to him.

All of those pictured are potential witnesses who may have information that can assist and police are urging them to come forward. Officers are also asking anyone with information about who they are to get in touch.

Detective Superintendent Katie Elliott is appealing for those pictured to come forward.

“Officers have trawled through hundreds of hours of CCTV images and then carried out considerable work to identify everyone who was in the area around the time that Corrie disappeared. As you’ll see from the images, some are of better quality than others, but it is important that we identify everyone who was in the area in the early hours of Saturday 24 September, as someone could, unknowingly, hold a clue that can help us find Corrie. It should be stressed that these are just potential witnesses and it’s possible they may not be aware that they may be able to assist but we are trying to rule out possibilities and therefore we do need to speak to you.

“It has been a painstaking process first to go through the footage – hundreds of hours worth - and then to identify those in the area. All the work we have done is being checked and re-checked and this remains a complex enquiry, which we continue to work on to progress so we can find Corrie and give his family the answers they need.”

The CCTV images show;
(Full size images available in the gallery at the very bottom of this page.)

A man in a white T-shirt and dark bottoms, with short hair, at 3.21am in Cornhill Walk

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Two figures at 3.21am in Cornhill Walk

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A figure in dark clothing at 3.35am in Cornhill Walk

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A person on a bicycle, thought to be male with short hair, wearing dark clothing at 3.56am. He was seen on CCTV cycling around the Cornhill area and is here captured in the area of The Grapes in Brentgovel Street

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Another figure wearing dark clothing at 5.01am in Cornhill Walk

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A person wearing dark clothing possibly with a light top underneath and carrying a bag or backpack at 5.18am in Cornhill Walk

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Two people at 3.19am coming from the Cornhill market square area towards McDonalds

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Two people wearing lighter coloured clothing at 3.26am coming from the Cornhill market square area towards McDonalds

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A man in lighter coloured clothing with a dark coloured backpack at 5.20am in the Cornhill market square area

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Full size images available in the gallery at the very bottom of this page.

Anyone who can identify any of these individuals is asked to call the incident room on 01473 782019.

With regards to the ongoing investigation Detective Superintendent Katie Elliot said;

“Finding Corrie remains a priority for Suffolk Police. We are continuing to investigate his disappearance and our focus remains on locating him and discovering what happened.

“Since he was reported missing thousands of hours of police time have been spent on carrying out hundreds of enquiries, including searches, comprehensive analysis of CCTV footage, and background work to see if any other factors may have been involved in his disappearance.

“Suffolk Police have been supported by a range of other organisations and agencies – including the RAF and Suffolk Lowland Search and Rescue - to carry out this work and to review everything that has been done to try to ensure nothing has been missed. A number of experts external to Suffolk Constabulary have gone over the case and the work that has been done by Suffolk officers and specialists to ensure all possibilities are fully investigated.

“This remains an ongoing process. The detailed work done around CCTV alone has seen repeated viewings to see if Corrie can be spotted in any further images, to see who was in the area at the time and to track everyone there through the town. Extensive work has then been done to identify all those individuals, to trace them and talk to them.

“A large area in Bury St Edmunds and surrounding areas has been searched and a considerable amount of work has been carried out behind the scenes. This is a complex and comprehensive investigation, and police officers are carefully and closely examining all possibilities.

“We want to find Corrie and we have committed time, resources and effort to do this. The resources needed are reviewed by a chief officer on a weekly basis who will draw in the necessary staff according to the needs of the investigation.

“Our work will continue and we would like to thank all of those who have provided support and assistance to date.  

“We would ask anyone with information that may help this investigation to call the incident room on 01473 782019 or Crimestoppers, anonymously if required, on 0800 555 111.”

Previous release | 17 January 2017

Three people have been identified and work continues to trace two others after CCTV images were released on the Corrie McKeague enquiry last week.

Police are renewing appeals to trace the small number of people seen on CCTV on the morning of Corrie McKeague’s disappearance who have not yet been identified. Following the new appeal on Friday several people got in touch with police, leading to the positive identification of the woman in image 16, the man in image 4 and the man in image 1 and information being provided that may help police identify the other two individuals that images were issued of.

All of the images were of individuals in Bury St Edmunds town centre between 3.15am and 5.20am, close to the time of the last confirmed sighting of Corrie at 3.25am on Saturday 24 September.

Following previous appeals the vast majority of those in the area sought from CCTV have been identified, traced and spoken to by police officers, but there remain a small number who have not yet been identified.

All of those featured in the CCTV images issued on Friday were potential witnesses who could have information that can assist.

Officers would like to thank all those who have called in or viewed images at the pod in Bury and given names, and this information continues to be followed up.

Detective Superintendent Katie Elliott said; "Our extensive enquiries are ongoing with continuing CCTV analysis, searches and background work looking into all aspects of Corrie’s life.

"As part of our ongoing work to find him, the police team have trawled through over 1,000 hours of CCTV footage to search for any images of Corrie but also to identify all of those who were in the vicinity around the time of the last confirmed sighting to see if there’s anything they may be able to tell us that may help. It remains important that we identify everyone who was in the area of the ‘horseshoe’ in the early hours of Saturday 24 September, as someone could, unknowingly, hold a clue that can help us find Corrie.

"It should be stressed that these are just potential witnesses and it’s possible they may not be aware that they may be able to assist. We need to identify all those on the released images as we are trying to rule out all possibilities and therefore we do need to speak to you.”

Anyone with information should contact the incident room on 01473 782019. Alternatively you can use the non-emergency police number 101.

The CCTV images below;
(Images are also available in the gallery at the very bottom of this page.)

CCTV image 8 (Please note that it is just the cyclist that needs to be identified):

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CCTV image 26:

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PREVIOUS RELEASE

Police are renewing appeals to trace the small number of people seen on CCTV on the morning of Corrie McKeague’s disappearance who have not yet been identified.

Officers combing through CCTV have located images of individuals, who are believed to potentially be the same people shown in the grainy images previously released, who are still to be identified.

As before all of the images show individuals in Bury St Edmunds town centre between 3.15am and 5.20am, close to the time of the last confirmed sighting of Corrie at 3.25am on Saturday 24 September.

Following previous appeals the vast majority of those in the area sought from CCTV have been identified, traced and spoken to by police officers, but there remain a small number who have not yet been identified.

All of those pictured are potential witnesses who may have information that can assist and detectives are asking them or anyone who knows who they are to get in touch.

Police are still finding people who have not be in touch even though they may have information that could help and are continuing to ask anyone who was there to come forward.

Officers would also like to thank all those who have called in or viewed images at the pod in Bury and given names, and this information continues to be followed up.

Detective Superintendent Katie Elliott said; “Our extensive enquiries are ongoing with continuing CCTV analysis, searches and background work looking into all aspects of Corrie’s life.

“As part of our ongoing work to find him, the police team have trawled through over 1,000 hours of CCTV footage to search for any images of Corrie but also to identify all of those who were in the vicinity around the time of the last confirmed sighting to see if there’s anything they may be able to tell us that may help. It remains important that we identify everyone who was in the area of the ‘horseshoe’ in the early hours of Saturday 24 September, as someone could, unknowingly, hold a clue that can help us find Corrie.

“It should be stressed that these are just potential witnesses and it’s possible they may not be aware that they may be able to assist. We need to identify all those on the released images as we are trying to rule out all possibilities and therefore we do need to speak to you.”

Anyone with information should contact the incident room on 01473 782019. Alternatively you can use the non-emergency police number 101.

Previous release | 2 February 2017

Police are renewing appeals to trace three people captured on CCTV around the time of the last confirmed sighting of missing Corrie McKeague.

Following previous appeals, police still need to trace two individuals shown on CCTV – a cyclist and an older gentleman – as potential witnesses. A name had been given for the older gentleman but the named individual has been traced and was found not to be the man pictured. Work continues to positively identify the cyclist too, and police are renewing appeals for either of these men to come forward or anyone who can help to get in touch.

Police are now releasing a further image of a person who also needs to be identified.

On December 8 police released some CCTV images of figures seen in the vicinity of the ‘horseshoe’ between 3.15am and 5.20am on Saturday 24 September. Police have been trying to find better images of these individuals, leading to the release of the further images on January 13. Now a better image of one person, believed to feature in the images released on December 8, as being in the area around 5.15 – 5.20am, has been obtained and this is also being released to see if the person can be identified.

These are the last of the individuals seen on foot in the area between these times that have yet to be traced.

All of those featured in the CCTV images issued are potential witnesses who could have information that might assist and detectives are asking them or anyone who knows who they are to get in touch.

Detective Superintendent Katie Elliott said that work to locate Corrie continues to be a priority.

“This case has been managed in the same way as any other major investigation undertaken by the Joint Norfolk and Suffolk Major Investigations Team. This means that all information is managed on the computer system used to assist major investigations, that those people involved in the investigation have the correct level of training and the investigation has been overseen and resourced in accordance with national guidance on major investigations.

“We have had to work through the information provided in a logical way and follow systematic processes to ensure everything is looked at in detail. This has involved re-visiting and going over much of the work we have carried out too.

“Our aim from the outset has been to find Corrie. To that end we have searched extensively the places where he was likely to be found. Some locations have been searched more than once using specially trained officers, dogs and technical equipment, and this is normal practice in searches of this kind. The initial most likely scenario was that Corrie had tried somehow to get home from Bury St Edmunds and had come to harm and to that end searches focussed on the areas where he may have been had he tried to get back to RAF Honington.

“Later in the investigation more detailed searches have been carried out and some places have been re-visited. Our search strategy has been reviewed by peers, by another force and advice has been sought from the police national search advisor. As in any major investigation the search strategy remains under review as the case progresses and different scenarios become more or less likely or new information becomes available.

“We have also prioritised the viewing of CCTV for the places where Corrie was most likely to be seen and then worked out from there. A systematic approach gives assurance that he has not been missed on CCTV as some of the images are not clear and need to be viewed multiple times and by trained operatives to gain this level of assurance. We have tested the CCTV to see whether there is any way that he could have left the horseshoe area without being seen. We have identified nearly all of the people who were in the horseshoe area either shortly before or after Corrie went in there. As other locations have come into the investigation we have reviewed CCTV from these places to see if it assists the case.

“Over £300,000 has so far been spent on the investigation and we are putting every effort into finding Corrie. We have drawn on local and national experts and have been open to review by other forces and have continued to resource the search to find Corrie. The activities we have undertaken to date have been based on information and facts and not on assumptions.

“Although at this stage we have not received any information from the company employed by Nicola Urquhart, as soon as we receive any information that the company chooses to pass to the police this will be considered as part of the ongoing enquiry.  Any details coming into the investigation will be checked across the information held, and we continue to work in partnership with a number of agencies including the RAF on the continuing enquiry.

“What is crucially important is that the public provide any information they have about Corrie’s disappearance directly to the police in order that it can be properly recorded and investigated. The police don’t want to miss that vital piece of information that may help them to find Corrie.”

Any information relating to Corrie’s disappearance or about the potential witnesses should be passed to the incident room on 01473 782019. Alternatively you can call 101 and ask to speak to the team.

The CCTV images below;
(Images are also available in the gallery at the very bottom of this page.)

CCTV image 26:

 

 

 

Previous release | 10 February 2017

Police will be carrying out a search at a landfill site in Milton in Cambridgeshire as part of ongoing enquiries to try to discover what has happened to missing Corrie McKeague.

Since the start of the investigation police have been working through all possibilities in an ongoing bid to discover where Corrie is. The work has been prioritised with the most likely scenarios being examined in detail and other possibilities also being explored.

One of these lines of enquiry has been in respect of waste collections from the area, known as the horseshoe, around the time of the last sighting of Corrie.

It was known, and CCTV shows, that a waste lorry made a collection in the area a short time after the last confirmed sighting of Corrie and the lorry was seized in the early stages of the enquiry for forensic examination.  This did not reveal any traces of him, however the waste collection has been one line of enquiry police have persisted with and kept under constant review.

Throughout the investigation a search of the site has been a consideration as police have worked through the possible options as to what may have happened to Corrie, with officers looking at the feasibility and logistics of carrying out this search.

The area of the landfill site where waste collected from Bury St Edmunds that morning was deposited has not had further items put onto it since police alerted the site, early in the investigation, to the possibility that this may need to be searched.

The search will be a considerable task. The area identified is more than 920 square metres of waste down to a maximum depth of eight metres and it is estimated that it is likely take a team of specialist search trained police officers six to ten weeks to complete the work required. The safety and welfare of the officers  who will undertake the search and the noise and odour implications for local residents have all been factors that police have to take into consideration.

On-site preparatory work is already underway and the full scale search likely to commence around Wednesday 22 February once this initial work has been completed. The preparation will include building access ways to the area to be searched, carrying out scoping work, and putting appropriate facilities on the site to allow this search to be carried out in a thorough and comprehensive way.

Detectives investigating the case have kept an open mind from the start as to what may have occurred to Corrie and have been working to confirm why and how he went missing.

This has involved a systematic examination of the possible options including using CCTV, phone and social media analysis, searches, media appeals, talking to those who had contact with Corrie, investigating his background and social life and tracing those who were out in Bury St Edmunds at the time of the last sighting – 3.25am on Saturday 24 September.

Corrie was reported as missing to Suffolk Police at around 3.40pm on Monday 26 September by RAF Honington, having not reported for duty. At that stage the last time he had been seen was 2am on Saturday 24. Work immediately began to try and find him. Police formally publicised him as missing in the early hours of Tuesday 27 September, after basic checks had been carried out.

Since then thousands of hours of police time have been spent on carrying out hundreds of enquiries to try and find him. The work carried out by Suffolk Police has been reviewed by other constabularies and a variety of other organisations have helped in the searches and investigation, including the RAF and Suffolk Lowland Search and Rescue.

Detective Superintendent Katie Elliott said; “This is the next logical step in the investigation. Behind the scenes we have been working systematically through the options and we have examined a very broad range of evidence. This has involved an extensive examination of CCTV, phone and social media analysis, searches, media appeals, talking to those who had contact with Corrie, investigating his background and social life and tracing those who were out in Bury St Edmunds at the time of the last sighting – 3.25am on Saturday 24 September.

“Preparation work is already underway for the search and this will be progressed as quickly as possible. There are some measures that we need to put in place before the full search work starts as, in addition to the pressing need to find Corrie, we also have to consider local residents, site workers and the officers who will be carrying out the job of going through the waste.

“We know that physically searching the site has the potential to cause an increase in odour and we hope residents will understand that we and the site owners have taken this into consideration when making a decision to go ahead with the search. However we also hope they will understand why we are doing this as part of our continuing investigation to find Corrie.

“We need to find him and discover what happened to him. While the search may not provide the answers as to what happened it is something we need to do as our investigation continues.”

Police are liaising with Corrie’s family to keep them informed about what is planned, and will also be working to let residents in the area know why the work is being carried out.

Anyone with information about his disappearance is asked to call the incident room at Suffolk Police on 01473 782019.

Previous release | 17 February 2017

A further potential witness has been traced as the investigation into the disappearance of Corrie McKeague continues.

Police have identified the cyclist shown in recently released CCTV images – but are renewing appeals for any information to locate the two remaining individuals seen on foot in the area where Corrie was last seen who have not yet been positively identified  – an older gentleman and a person seen walking through the Brentgovel Street/ ‘horseshoe’ area of Bury St Edmunds around 5.15am – 5.20am on Saturday 24 September.

Both are potential witnesses who could have information that may assist and detectives continue to ask them or anyone who knows who they are to get in touch.

Officers have also been in touch with Corrie’s family today to update them with regards to progress on preparatory work ahead of the landfill site search.

The site itself, at Milton in Cambridgeshire, has to be made safe and accessible before the search work can get underway. This preparatory work has started but this is going to take slightly longer as 8,000 tonnes of bulk material will have to be removed first to allow safe access to where the search needs to take place.

Detective Superintendent Katie Elliott said that work to locate Corrie was continuing both in preparation for the site search and in the enquiries being made.  

“The work to trace Corrie remains a priority and we are continuing to progress our investigation as the work around the site search is being planned. It was initially hoped that the search could start next week, but the logistics of building access routes and ensuring the area is safely accessible for those who will be carrying out the work mean further preparatory activity will need to be done first.

“This is a considerable task and we need to ensure everything is in place before officers begin the process of going through the waste in the landfill.  We have been liaising with Corrie’s family around the timescales involved and, while we can’t confirm a start date, this preliminary work will be completed as quickly as possible, so the full scale search can take place.

“Our aim from the start was to find Corrie and we have been carefully going through all lines of enquiry in detail, checking and re-checking information that has been passed to us to discover what happened. We continue to receive assistance from a range of partner agencies, including the RAF, and we are very grateful for their continuing assistance.”

Police have also been reviewing data that has now been provided by a private company employed by Nicola Urquhart to see if this can provide any further information to assist the investigation.

Any information relating to Corrie’s disappearance or about the potential witnesses should be passed to the incident room on 01473 782019. Alternatively you can call 101 and ask to speak to the team.

The CCTV images below;
(Images are also available in the gallery at the very bottom of this page.)

CCTV image 26:

 

 

 

Previous release | 1 March 2017

Police have arrested a 26-year-old man on suspicion of attempting to pervert the course of justice as part of the continuing Corrie McKeague missing person investigation.

The man was arrested earlier today, Wednesday 1 March. He has been taken into custody where he will be interviewed on suspicion of attempting to pervert the course of justice relating to information provided to the investigation.

The man is not the driver of the bin lorry which collected refuse from the area where Corrie was last seen but officers will not be giving any further details at this time, as work to discover what happened to the 23-year-old RAF serviceman continues.

Preparatory work is continuing on a landfill site at Milton ahead of a police search which is now likely to start in the next seven days. Work is being carried out to move a large volume of bulk material and to build access routes to allow the search to get underway.

Police are also now issuing footage of the two remaining individuals who were seen on foot in the Brentgovel Street/ ‘horseshoe’ area around the time of the last confirmed sighting of Corrie. Both are potential witnesses as they were seen in the vicinity between 3.20am and 5.20am on Saturday 24 September. Still images of both have previously been issued by Suffolk Police.

Detective Superintendent Katie Elliott said; “We are continuing to make progress on the investigation and we will be starting the landfill site search as soon as the preparatory work is complete.  We have been carrying out a lot of enquiries behind the scenes and our work continues to find the truth about what happened to Corrie.”

Any information relating to Corrie’s disappearance or about the potential witnesses should be passed to the incident room on 01473 782019. Alternatively you can call 101 and ask to speak to the team.

Previous release | 1 March 2017

A 26-year-old man arrested on suspicion of attempting to pervert the course of justice has now been bailed to return to police in April.

The 26-year-old was arrested earlier today, Wednesday 1 March, and was taken into custody where he was interviewed on suspicion of attempting to pervert the course of justice relating to information provided to the continuing Corrie McKeague missing person investigation.

The man is not the driver of the bin lorry which collected refuse from the area where Corrie was last seen and is not related to Corrie.

Following the interview, he has now been bailed to return to police on April 13, while further enquiries are made.

Any information relating to Corrie’s disappearance or about the potential witnesses should be passed to the incident room on 01473 782019. Alternatively you can call 101 and ask to speak to the team.

Previous release | 6 March 2017

Police will begin a full-scale search of part of a landfill site at Milton in Cambridgeshire this week as part of the continuing investigation to find Corrie McKeague.

Following preparatory work including building access routes to the area of the site that needs to be searched, moving 8,000 tonnes of bulk material and placing facilities at the location, the full scale search will now begin.

Detective Superintendent Katie Elliott said;

“The search is likely to take six to ten weeks to complete, although this will obviously depend on daily progress on the site. We have a large area – around 920 square metres, up to a depth of eight metres – of waste to search through and a plan has been put in place to manage this process to ensure a thorough and comprehensive search is undertaken.

“Teams of specialist search trained police officers from both Suffolk and Norfolk will be carrying out the work to find anything that may be linked to the investigation.

“In planning the search we have taken into account not only the need to find Corrie, but also factors including the noise, odour and disruption implications for local residents and site workers, and the safety and welfare of the officers who will undertake the search.

"We know that physically searching the site has the potential to cause an increase in odour and we have taken steps to reduce this as much as possible. We hope residents will understand that we and the site owners have taken all these things into consideration when making a decision to go ahead with the search. However we also hope they will also understand why we are doing this as part of our ongoing enquiries to find Corrie.

"We need to find him and discover what happened to him. While the search may not provide the answers as to what happened it is something we need to do as our investigation continues.”

Since Corrie was reported as missing, police have been working through all possibilities to discover where he is. The work has been prioritised with the most likely scenarios being examined in detail.

One of these lines of enquiry has been in respect of waste collections from the area, known as the horseshoe, around the time of the last sighting of Corrie.

It was known, and CCTV shows, that a waste lorry made a collection in the area a short time after the last confirmed sighting of Corrie and the lorry was seized in the early stages of the enquiry for forensic examination.  This did not reveal any traces of him, however the waste collection has been one line of enquiry police have persisted with and kept under constant review.

The area of the landfill site where waste collected from Bury St Edmunds that morning was deposited has not had further items put onto it since police alerted the site, early in the investigation, to the possibility that this may need to be searched.

Detectives working on the case have carried out a systematic examination of the possible options including using CCTV, phone and social media analysis, searches, media appeals, talking to those who had contact with Corrie, investigating his background and social life and tracing those who were out in Bury St Edmunds at the time of the last sighting – 3.25am on Saturday 24 September.

Anyone with information about his disappearance is asked to call the incident room at Suffolk Police on 01473 782019.

Previous release | 7 March 2017

A 26-year-old man arrested on suspicion of attempting to pervert the course of justice as part of the continuing Corrie McKeague missing person investigation has been told he will face no further action.

The 26-year-old was arrested on Wednesday 1 March and interviewed about information provided to the investigation before being bailed. However, after more work by detectives, he has now been told he will face no further action.

Police have been carrying out extensive work to check and re-check data provided to officers.  As a result of this comprehensive checking process and analysis it was discovered that the initial weight of the waste pick-up supplied to the investigation was incorrect and that it was far higher than originally thought.

This directly led to the arrest as police moved to secure any potential evidence however, following further work and the interviewing of a second man under caution, detectives now believe there was no attempt to hide information.

Detective Superintendent Katie Elliott said; "Through the persistence of officers and their detailed work we recently identified that the data provided was incorrect. We now know the weight of the waste collection from the ‘horseshoe’ on the night Corrie went missing was over 100kg, when the original information we were given indicated that this was 11kg, and this makes our search of the landfill the next logical step to try to find Corrie.

“The investigation has identified that the company who provided the data usually charge per collection, not per weight of load collected, and it appears that it was genuinely believed by the company that the data provided was correct. There was no intention to mislead the investigation, however our discovery, through persisting with this through our enquiries and evidence gathering, now puts a new emphasis on the search.

“Corrie’s family have been made aware of this new information and we continue to liaise with them as we move forward.

“Our extensive work around CCTV to see if Corrie could have left the Brentgovel Street area and the vast number of other enquiries we have been making have been crucial to getting us to this point.

“We have had to be methodical and systematic in our approach to ensure we were not ruling out the line of enquiry that may give us the answers. The search of the landfill is a huge undertaking, and still may not provide the answer as to what happened, but now, with new information uncovered by the officers working on the case, this is the priority.

“We would like to thank all of those organisations who have been assisting with the investigation. Their assistance and co-operation throughout has allowed us to conduct the enquiries we needed to do and we are grateful that they have been supportive of our work.”

Any information relating to Corrie’s disappearance should be passed to the incident room on 01473 782019. Alternatively you can call 101 and ask to speak to the team.

Previous release | 24 March 2017

Previous release | 24 March 2017

As a search continues at a landfill site in Milton in Cambridgeshire, police are confirming that the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) will be working alongside officers investigating Corrie McKeague’s disappearance.

A team of specialist trained search officers from Suffolk and Norfolk Constabularies are continuing work at the site and have now been through more than 845 tonnes of material in the search.

Detective Superintendent Katie Elliott said; “Officers have been liaising with the HSE as part of the investigation into the circumstances around what happened to Corrie.

“At this stage our search at Milton continues. If there is a find on the site then the HSE will have a role to play in looking into the procedures that were in place and we have been speaking with them to ensure they are aware of our investigation to date.

“Officers have completed thousands of hours of enquiries to find Corrie and through the work that has been completed over the past few months we have gathered a substantial amount of information which will inform both our own and any potential HSE investigation as we move forward.”

Previous release | 28 March 2017

Police can confirm that a young woman who was one of two remaining people seen on foot in the area where Corrie McKeague was last seen has been spoken to by officers.

The woman had been seen on CCTV in the Brentgovel Street area of Bury St Edmunds around 5.15am – 5.20am on Saturday 24 September and officers had been making appeals to trace her, along with an older gentleman who has yet to be traced.

She has now been spoken to and has confirmed she is the person in the images but she has not been able to add anything further to assist the investigation.  

Officers are now in the fourth week of work at a landfill site in Milton in Cambridgeshire and have now been through around 1,000 tonnes of waste material in the search.

Previous release | 9 May 2017

Search work at the Milton landfill site will continue for at least a further week as the hunt for missing Corrie McKeague continues.

Officers have now cleared well over 3,100 tonnes of waste on the site and have completed work on searching the cell that was originally identified. However, towards the edges of the area it has also been noticed that the waste may have naturally shifted from the place where it was originally deposited and the search has been extended into these areas which may still hold the answer to Corrie’s disappearance.

Throughout the search officers have found material that have indicated they are in the right area – finding waste that was clearly identifiable as being from Bury St Edmunds, and within the right time frame.

The work being completed is continually being reviewed, with daily updates being passed to senior officers overseeing the investigation. In view of the dates on items still being found and advice from officers on the ground and the site team, the search will continue into week 11.

The officers carrying out the search have been working extremely hard in difficult circumstances – with the nature of the waste being searched through, safety considerations, the weather and the depth of the search required presenting a number of daily challenges.

Throughout the search Corrie has very much been in the forefront of officers’ minds.

The total cost of the investigation to date, including the search of the site, is estimated at over £1million and enquiries have been continuing, with officers gathering further information about Corrie’s lifestyle and background.

Previous release | 17 May 2017


Previous release | 17 May 2017

A search on the landfill site at Milton in Cambridgeshire will continue as Suffolk Police continue to investigate the disappearance of Corrie McKeague.

Over 3,500 tonnes of waste have been searched through over the past ten and a half weeks as specialist search trained officers from both Suffolk and Norfolk police continue to look for anything that may assist the investigation.

No trace of Corrie has been found to date, however, throughout the search, officers have been finding items that are from the correct dates, around the time that Corrie went missing, and that are clearly from Bury St Edmunds.

The search has been expanded after waste linked to both the right dates and the right location were found outside the initial cell area identified.

As this type of search is so unusual, it was not known how the waste would have moved and as the work has progressed officers have gained a greater understanding of both how the waste is deposited and spread out, and the nature and construction of the site. Officers continue to take all of this into account as the search continues.

The work is under constant review and now, in week 11, in view of the dates on items still being found and advice from officers on the ground and the site team, it is likely the search will continue for at least three further weeks to ensure that the area holding waste from the relevant period is comprehensively examined.

Previous release | 21 July 2017

Milton search

The search of a Cambridgeshire landfill site to find anything related to the disappearance of missing Corrie McKeague will be completed this afternoon. 

Officers are now in the 20th week of a targeted search at the Milton landfill site directed by the information and intelligence gathered as part of the investigation, and, while officers have been finding waste from the correct time frame throughout the work, no trace of Corrie has been found.

The search team will have completed work by 3pm this afternoon, Friday 21 July, and will have searched through more than 6,500 tonnes of waste.

Police have been searching the area where waste was deposited between Monday 19 September – when the new cell 22 was opened for waste deposits - and Monday 3 October, which is when police notified the site after early enquiries had indicated the bin lorry may be of interest.

Detective Superintendent Katie Elliott said; “Our thoughts are with Corrie’s family as we had hoped that this search would have provided them with the answers about what happened to him.

“This has been an unprecedented search, in the scale and amount of waste that has been examined. We have searched the whole area where we believed Corrie could be. We had compelling information that directed us to this area however we haven’t found Corrie and this is bitterly disappointing.

“We have searched over 6500 tonnes of waste, excavating a huge area. Without anything further to tell us where he might be on such a vast site the search cannot continue.

“Officers have been finding items such as newspapers and other material that have September 2016 dates on them. This is the time that Corrie went missing. Some items have been clearly identifiable as coming from Bury St Edmunds and this has confirmed that we have been searching in the right place, however none of these items have had any link to Corrie. We have also found items such as mobile phones, footwear and clothing and each one of these items has been checked to ensure it did not belong to Corrie.

“We have completed the search of the area where we know waste was deposited in this period. In fact we have searched an area that is larger than was originally designated. The work was initially extended to include areas containing additional waste dated in the correct time frame and was further extended in response to new information regarding the location of further relevant waste.

“Sadly, we have not found Corrie or any trace of his clothing or mobile phone.

“All the work we have carried out, particularly around the weight of the bin lorry collection, points to Corrie being taken to the landfill site.

“The search has been complex, systematic, thorough and comprehensive. Throughout the process the work being completed has been reviewed by national experts.

“The investigation behind the scenes hasn’t stood still while the search has been carried out, but all the information we have still points to the fact that Corrie was transported from the ‘horseshoe’ area in the bin lorry.

“Having been through all of the possibilities in detail, there is nothing to support any theory other than that Corrie was in the bin. There are no further sightings of him on CCTV to suggest he left the area, and we have explored the other possibilities as to how he left – such as being taken from the area by someone – and there is no evidence to support that this is the case. 

“On CCTV he appears to be alone and we have traced and spoken to everyone who walked through Brentgovel Street around the relevant time, and none of them have seen anything suspicious.

“We know that Corrie’s phone travelled away from Bury St Edmunds at the same time as the bin lorry that collected waste from Brentgovel Street. The theory that Corrie was in the bin that was emptied into the bin lorry shortly after he was last seen is strengthened by credible information that we have obtained through our enquiries that Corrie had been known to go to sleep in rubbish, following a night out.

“We’ve explored every other reasonable hypothesis – and there is nothing to support any other explanation.

Police have confirmed other details around the search;

Milton landfill site is over 48 hectares and accepts approximately 96,000 tonnes of waste per year.

Police contacted the site on Monday 3 October, a week after Corrie was reported as missing. As soon as he had been reported missing, on the afternoon of Monday 26 September, police began an extensive search for him, carrying out ground, air and water searches within the first week, completing initial background enquiries, while also looking at CCTV for positive sightings to try and trace his movements after he left his friends in Bury St Edmunds.

Officers had quickly viewed CCTV to track where he had been and determined that he had been seen in Brentgovel Street around 3.25am.  While CCTV was being examined around the area for further sightings, the viewing was also moving forward in time and it was then identified there had been a bin lorry collection in the area around 4.15am - 4.20am on Saturday, 24 September. Further enquiries determined the waste was taken to Milton for landfill disposal. This was the only bin collected from the area on Saturday 24 and waste from it was taken first to a transfer station and then onto Milton landfill site.

It is known there were several collections in Bury St Edmunds after the Brentgovel Street one before the bin lorry went on to other collections in Mildenhall, Newmarket, Soham and Ely.

Police were initially advised that the weight of the bin pick-up was 11kg however, following repeated checking with the company by officers, it was discovered the weight of the bin was much higher than originally thought – over 100kg.

Cell 22 was opened on Monday 19 September and waste from the relevant time period and from Bury St Edmunds was deposited here, as well as waste from other parts of the region. However it has been determined during the course of the search that waste may have been spread and moved across the area as part of standard procedures on the site. This has informed our search parameters. Cell 22 and its borders are where police have been searching.

The site is a combination of waste material and heavy clay soil – making the search difficult due to the intense physical activity of raking through the clay and the type of items that have to be searched through.

The officers carrying out the search have been working extremely hard in difficult circumstances – with the nature of the waste being searched through, safety considerations, the weather and the depth of the search required presenting a number of daily challenges. Throughout this time their minds have been very focused on Corrie and what might be found.

Det Supt Elliott said; “I cannot thank them enough for their efforts; in recent weeks searchers have been working in 20-30 degree heat while wearing layers of protective clothing – heavyweight trousers to protect from sharp items, face masks and gloves - and have needed hydration tablets in addition to supplies of water to combat the risk of heat exhaustion. 

“We have been absolutely committed to finding Corrie and none of us wanted to be in this position, where we are unable to provide the answer.

“This has been one of the biggest and most complex searches of a landfill site in the country. This search process has been reviewed as it has been carried out and what we have learned and the expertise gathered during the search is now being called upon by other constabularies.

“We would like to thank contractors and staff at the site for all their assistance throughout the work.”

Officers have been exploring all possibilities since the start of the missing person investigation. The initial CCTV work has given detectives a good picture of who was in the area at the relevant times and police have a number of statements which corroborate each other after cross-referencing various witness accounts.

Police have been looking at what may have happened including whether Corrie got into the bin himself or whether it may have been physically possible for someone to have lifted someone of Corrie’s build into the bin between the last confirmed sighting at 3.25am and the bin lorry collection around 4.18am, and whether there could have been an accident or any criminal activity.

Officers have also looked at Corrie’s previous behaviour and have spoken to friends and colleagues about his actions during and following a night out.

Suffolk Police have commissioned a review of the work completed since the start of the investigation to see if anything further can be done to trace Corrie McKeague.

We remain open minded and should this review reveal further lines of enquiry that will help us find Corrie we will pursue them vigorously.

It is estimated the investigation has cost over £1.2million to date, the vast majority of this relating to the cost of searching the site.

The Police & Crime Commissioner for Suffolk understood the necessity to do this work and provided the funds for this search.

 

 

Previous release

The search at the landfill site at Milton in Cambridgeshire will continue as officers work to trace missing Corrie McKeague.

Specialist officers from Suffolk and Norfolk police have been searching the area of the landfill site which was identified as holding waste from the Bury St Edmunds area in the relevant time period.

The work is constantly being reviewed and, as the search team are still finding items from the right time frame that are identifiable as coming from the town, the search will continue on a week by week basis.

Throughout the search officers have been working to understand exactly where waste was deposited and how it may have been spread out during the process.

This week police will be bulk-moving further material to allow the work to continue. This is being done to ensure all parts of the relevant area are covered following further detailed and specific work completed around the GPS positioning of the vehicle which brought the waste to the site.

This has led to an expansion of the original search parameters as work continues to locate anything that may help the investigation into Corrie’s disappearance.

Around 4,430 tonnes of waste have been searched through to date.

Previous release | 21 September 2017

A year on after RAF serviceman Corrie McKeague went missing officers investigating his disappearance will have a visible presence in Bury St Edmunds town centre this weekend.

A police pod will be present in the town centre where  Brentgovel Street meets Risbygate Street opposite ‘The Grapes’ public house. This will be staffed from 9pm (Fri 22 Sept) to 4am (Sat 23 Sept), 9am to 5pm (Sat 23 Sept) and   from midday (Sun 24 Sept). Police officers from the investigation will be present and will be available to speak to members of the public in an effort to see if this can generate any new lines of inquiry or any fresh information as to what exactly happened to Corrie.

Police are also issuing CCTV stills of individuals that officers believe may have had some interaction with Corrie on the night he went missing. Officers would like to stress that the individuals depicted are people who are not key witnesses, are not being treated as suspects and have no direct link with Corrie, but may have information that may help understand what happened to him.

Female image 20a shows a woman in the doorway of Flex nightclub on the Saturday morning (24 Sept 2016) at about 2.23am. Female image 20b is a still of the same woman.

Male image 20a shows a male also entering Flex nightclub. Male image 20b is an image of both the male and female (in image 20) together. Images 26 are images of an individual outside McDonalds that police have issued previously and have been unable to trace. The first was taken at around 4.30am outside McDonalds, the second inside McDonalds is taken at about 5.30am. The image of the bald male with the red jacket is of someone walking away from Flex nightclub at about 1.25am on 24 September. The final images of Persons L,M,N,O are all from the entrance to Flex nightclub at about 1.16am on 24 September 2016 and who officers know that Corrie had a brief interaction with before the group of four males entered the Flex club

Detective Superintendent Katie Elliott said: "Our thoughts are with Corrie’s family and friends 12 months on from his disappearance. It is fair to say that a year on from him going missing, we never thought we would be in this position of not yet locating Corrie or establishing exactly what happened to him. We have always wanted to provide answers to Corrie’s family about what happened to him.

“The search for Corrie remains an active investigation.

“We would appeal directly to the public who were out in Bury St Edmunds exactly 12 months ago on the night he went missing and maybe a year on are once again back in the town centre this weekend.

“We would ask the public to call us if they have fresh information that may be of benefit to the investigation.  We have deliberately placed the police pod on Brentgovel Street as we know this is the route Corrie took on that evening and hope our presence will jog someone’s memory.

“As we said in July the fact that Corrie wasn’t found at the landfill site during our extensive search remains bitterly disappointing to us. We had compelling information that directed us to this particular area of the landfill site.

“The investigation has been a detailed and methodical one to date and this will continue in the weeks ahead. The East Midlands Special Operations Unit has been commissioned to conduct a detailed review of the investigation to date. The aim of the review is to assist in identifying whether there are any lines of inquiry that could lead to information that would locate Corrie. The review is progressing well and is due to be completed in the next few weeks.

“If it should reveal further lines of enquiry that will help police find Corrie the force will pursue them vigorously.”

Anyone with information is asked to contact the Major Investigation Team at Suffolk police on 01473 782019 or 101.

Corrie was reported as missing on the afternoon of Monday 26 September 2016 after he failed to turn up for work at RAF Honington as planned. He had the weekend off and had headed into Bury St Edmunds for a night out with his friends and colleagues on Friday evening, 23 September 2016. The last confirmed sighting of Corrie was on Saturday 24 September 2016 at around 3.25am on Brentgovel Street in the town centre.

Previous release | 22 September 2017

Police investigating the disappearance of Corrie McKeague can confirm that four of the individuals (images L,M,N,O) released to the media in CCTV images yesterday (Thur 21 September) have now been identified.

It comes after one of the males came forward yesterday evening and identified himself following the appeal to the media. He has also given names of the three friends he was with on the night and whose images were also issued.

From speaking with this male police understand there was a brief interaction ending on friendly terms with Corrie and as there was no further contact after this they are not considered to be significant to the investigation as was stated yesterday. The group of four knew Corrie and joked with him before they went their separate ways. Police will speak to the three other males in due course.

Police are also able to confirm that the male and female (images 20a SE11 and 20b SE11) have come forward and identified themselves. The two people will also be spoken to in due course.

Images below:

Bald male with the red jacket is of someone walking away from Flex nightclub

 

 

Images 26 are images of an individual outside MacDonalds that police have issued previously and have been unable to trace.

Previous release | 3 October 2017

Police are to extend the search for Corrie McKeague at the Milton landfill site.

The decision to resume the search at the site for the missing airman has been taken after thorough consideration of all the issues involved.

Careful re-checking of the data available to the Major Investigation Team has concluded the area of the original 20-week search is still the location where there was the highest likelihood of finding Corrie.

However, the nature of waste disposal and its movement is not a precise science.

During the inquiry officers have had to acknowledge and understand the potential for variance in the information they have to work from.

The pause following the initial search between March and July has allowed detectives the opportunity to thoroughly scrutinise the robustness of this data once again.

The extended search, which is likely to take four to six weeks, will concentrate on an area of Cell 22 next to the site of the earlier search. The indications are this is the next most likely area where Corrie could be.

Detective Superintendent Katie Elliott said: "Throughout this rigorous investigation we have remained committed to following all reasonable lines of enquiry in our endeavours to discover what has happened to Corrie.

"Confronted by the variances in the way waste can be deposited and through further investigation we cannot discount the possibility Corrie may be elsewhere in Cell 22. Therefore, we believe our decision to extend the search area is the correct one.

"We have spoken to Corrie’s mum and dad to explain our decision, and share in detail the reasons behind it. We will, of course, continue to work together with Corrie’s family as the inquiry progresses.

"We can only hope that over the coming weeks the resumption of the search brings the answers that we are all hoping for and especially, of course, for Nicola and Martin.

Corrie was last seen in the area of Bury St Edmunds known as the ‘horseshoe’ where there was a bin lorry collection at around 4.15am - 4.20am on Saturday, 24 September, 2016.

Only one bin was collected from the area that morning. Waste from it was initially taken to a transfer station at Red Lodge and then to the Milton landfill site.

On-site preparatory work for the resumption of the search will commence this week. The full-scale search is likely to begin once this has been completed.

A review of the Suffolk Constabulary investigation is being conducted by the East Midlands Special Operations Unit (EMSOU).

The constabulary’s decision to extend the search is supported by the review team although its report has yet to be concluded.

Previous release | 4 October 2017

Police investigating the disappearance of Corrie McKeague can confirm that another individual who had their image released to the media on Thursday 21 September has now been identified.

It is the image of a bald male with the red jacket walking away from Flex nightclub in Bury St Edmunds at about 1.25am on 24 September. This individual has come forward to police but has not been able to assist the investigation.

Previous release | 20 October 2017

Police can confirm that the resumption of the search for Corrie McKeague at the Milton landfill site will begin next week (Monday 23 October).

The extended search, which is likely to take around four to six weeks, will concentrate on an area of Cell 22 next to the site of the earlier search. The indications are this is the next most likely area where Corrie could be.

Careful re-checking of the data available to the Major Investigation Team has concluded the area of the original 20-week search is still the location where there was the highest likelihood of finding Corrie. However, the nature of waste disposal and its movement is not a precise science, hence the requirement to extend the search.

Previous release I 27 October 2017

Suffolk Constabulary can confirm that officers involved in the Corrie McKeague missing person inquiry have received the report following a review of the investigation.

The review was conducted by the East Midlands Special Operations Unit. The report concludes that police have conducted a thorough, methodical and detailed investigation and explored all reasonable lines of inquiry with no new further leads needing to be pursued.

The review also concludes that Corrie is most likely to be in the Milton landfill site and the review also supports the continued search of the eastern end of cell 22 at the Milton landfill site which began on Monday 23 October.

Previous release I 11 December 2017

Police have completed the search of a second area at the Milton landfill site as part of their inquiry to find Corrie McKeague.

The search of an extended area of Cell 22 began on October 23, 2017.

Although the data available indicated this was the next most likely area where Corrie might be found following the original 20-week search of the cell earlier this year, there was no trace of him.

Police are content Corrie is not in the landfill areas which have now been searched.

The inquiry team has identified all the other possible locations where waste has been deposited from the area in Bury St Edmunds known as the ‘horseshoe’ and there are no further realistic search opportunities at this time.

As previously stated, the nature of waste disposal and its movement is not an exact science.

The primary hypothesis - that Corrie ended up in the waste disposal process - was endorsed by a review of the investigation undertaken by the East Midlands Special Operations Unit (EMSOU).

The EMSOU officers who conducted the review were given access to all of the information they needed to conduct a thorough review, including all of the witness statements.

Following the conclusion of the landfill search site today the investigation into Corrie’s disappearance on September 24, 2016, will continue.

He was last seen on CCTV entering a loading bay in the ‘horseshoe’ following a night out.

CCTV in Bury St Edmunds town centre has already been viewed up to 4pm on 24th September 2016 and Corrie has not been seen to leave.

However, we will continue to scrutinise the other theories in order to try to establish and understand what may have happened to Corrie.

Detective Superintendent Katie Elliott said: "We are still committed to continuing with the inquiry. There are a number of other theories about what could have happened to Corrie and we are continuing to test the evidence to help us understand what happened to Corrie, which will assist in providing answers to his family.

"We feel it is important to explain to the family what we are doing, so they have the opportunity to understand and question what we have done, and why we have done it.

"We are acutely aware of the immense strain the last 15 months has placed upon Corrie’s loved ones. We want them to be confident we are doing everything that it is practical for us to do as we strive to find Corrie.”

Suffolk Constabulary would like to thank FCC Environment, owner of the Milton landfill site, for its support and co-operation during the inquiry.

The total amount searched in this second phase of the search was 2,867.5 tonnes.